Topic #5: Digital Citizenship – Identity, Footprint, & Social Activism


cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by courosa

Well, it’s been an amazing experience, but the #etmooc community is about to commence on the final scheduled topic, Digital Citizenship. Over the next two weeks, we’re hoping to have people participate in re/defining what Digital Citizenship is, and what it means for children and adults. The term has been around for quite some time, and has taken on a number of subtopics and meanings (Ribble’s Nine Elements is a notable example). We encourage #etmooc’ers to take on some or all of these topics, or to develop their own. In terms of our scheduled events, these will focus mostly on the facets of identity, footprint, and social activism.

EVENTS:

  1. To kick things off, there will be a general Digital Citizenship presentation facilitated by Alec Couros on March 18, 7pm Eastern time. Connect in Blackboard Collaborate at http://couros.ca/x/connect.
  2. As per usual, our Twitter Chats will be held on Wednesdays (March 20 & 27) at 7pm  Eastern. Watch the @etmooc account and the #etmchat hashtag.
  3. On March 25th, we are very fortunate to have Bonnie Stewart join us to facilitate a session titled, “Digital Identities: Who are we in a Networked Public?”. This session will also take place in Blackboard Collaborate at http://couros.ca/x/connect.

Those will be the ‘officially’ planned events. However, because this is near the end of #etmooc, we’d love to see participant-led Google Hangouts (or other events) organized or streamed. For instance, it would be great to see a participate-led panel organized that focuses on questions such as, “What does it mean to be a citizen today?” and “How do we foster such citizens in our educational institutions?”. Is there anyone willing to take this on? Send out a tweet, get a few people organized, choose a time, and let us know (tweet @courosa). I’ll add any such events to the #etmooc Calendar.

It would also be nice to have a bit of a closing event for the #etmooc experience. We’d absolutely LOVE your thoughts on this. If you have ideas, please tweet them with #etmooc.

ASSIGNMENTS:
We have a few suggested assignments for this topic.

#etmooc Summary of Learning – Create a final ‘summary of learning’ artefact reflecting on what you have learned during your time in #etmooc. Choose an appropriate digital tool or mode (a blog post, screencast, video, image, etc), and reflect on your learning. When you’re done, tweet the link to your work using the #etmetc hashtag (note: it’s one we haven’t used before) and/or post it in the Google Community. We’d like to eventually collect all of the artefacts here. If you are looking for inspiration, take a look at these student ‘Summaries of Learning‘ collected from undergrad and graduate level courses (scroll down). These links go back several years so there are many examples to view.

If you are not sure where to start with this assignment, here are some prompt questions.

  • Think back on your time in #etmooc and share your final thoughts about the ideas and the people you have connected with.
  • What have you created or curated?  What tools did you try?
  • How are you making/have you made  your learning visible?
  • What goals did you have when you began #etmooc ?  How did those change or evolve over the last 10 weeks?
  • How do you plan on staying connected to the people and the ideas?
  • Imagine that Twitter goes away. How would this connected network of #etmooc endure or stay connected? What would you do?
  • How have you changed as a digital educator and citizen? How do you see yourself (your identity) now?

Six Word Stories: Prior to the March 27th #etmchat, we’d like all participants to think about and create a 6-word-story related to the following question, “What does it mean to be an educator and digital citizen? What is our special role?”

During the chat we will start by asking people to share their 6-word-stories. We hope that this will inspire insight to deepen our discussion. For the remainder of the chat, we will focus on questions such as “What themes do we see?”, “What inspires us?”, and “How do we move forward?”. As a final #etmchat, we hope that we not only share insight into the topic, but thoughts on how we can move forward together, as a community of practice.

#etmooc Supports A Cause: As mentioned in the very first #etmooc session, a possibly great outcome of developing this community would be to utilize our collective networks/power to identify and support a common cause or charity. If there are people with thoughts on how we could make this happen, let’s start this conversation and quickly move to action. This could be really wonderful, but we’ll need a lot of help on this one.

RESOURCES:
As always, we’d love you to share your resources with us in our #etmooc Diigo Group. We’ve also shared a few below that may be of interest.

We’re really looking forward to the next two weeks!

~your #etmooc co-conspirators

Topic #4: The Open Movement – Open Access, OERs & Future of Education


cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by courosa

Welcome to topic #4!

Over the next two weeks we hope to support your thinking and creativity around the very BIG and nebulous topic of ‘The Open Movement’. So what exactly is the Open Movement? Well, it’s not one thing. Rather, the Open Movement is an umbrella term that describes a number of overlapping and interrelated movements that, collectively, support the idea of a free and open society in the Arts, Education, government, computing/code, research, technology, medicine, copyright/copyleft, and other key areas. Over the next two weeks, we will  focus (mostly) on the Open Education piece of this movement but, as always, feel free to move well beyond what we provide.

To get you thinking, here are a few suggested activities:

  1. Check out some of the Wikipedia articles around the Open Movement. See The Open Source Movement vs. The Free Software Movement (see tension between ‘Open’ & ‘Free’), The Free Culture Movement, Open Education, Open Access, Open Educational Resources and Open Government. Follow primary sources, read, write, synthesize, and share back to #etmooc. You will likely see that ‘open’ is much more than making something freely available on your website. There are deep philosophical, political, and pragmatic ideas embedded in each of these movements. What are the benefits? What are the tensions? What are the critiques? What does an open future look like? And, will it happen?
  2. Consider watching RIP: A Remixer’s Manifesto. It’s a full-length documentary available for free at Archive.org (read here about Archive.org – it’s a great resource). The documentary follows the life of remix artist Gregg Gillis (aka Girl Talk) and discusses the issues around fair use, copyright/copyleft, and remix. Near the end, the documentary bridges into the concept of free culture as it applies to Brazil’s favelas.  It would be great if #etmooc’ers shared their thoughts about the film in their own blogs or our Google Plus communityPerhaps we could even arrange an #etmooc synchronous screening and live Twitter chat if people are interested?
  3. For Higher Education participants in particular, I would strongly recommend viewing David Wiley‘s Keynote Presentation, Openness, Disaggregation, and the Future of Education (slides available here). Where does open education fit into what we do as educators and scholars? If you are in agreement that universities ought to be more open, how do we support this? For instance, if we support open access research, should we boycott locked-down academic journals?
  4. Watch Larry Lessig’s Talk Laws That Choke Creativity. Near the end of the talk, at 17:36, Lessig discusses how current copyright laws may affect our kids (“… ordinary people live life against the law, and that’s what we are doing to our kids … they live life knowing they live it against the law”). How important is copyright reform? How do we achieve a balanced approach for both consumers & creators, especially in a world where the distinction between these two groups is hardly noticeable.
  5. Do you have a story of openness that you’d like to share? If so, please consider supporting Alan Levine’s “True Stories of Openness” project found at: http://stories.cogdogblog.com. View some of stories already submitted, considering submitting your own, and share the resource with others.  This is a powerful project, and a wonderful way to promote and share the benefits of openness.

Additionally, we welcome you to suggest your ideas for readings, viewings, activities, etc. in your blog, on Twitter, or in our Google Plus Community. We look forward to your recommendations. Thanks for your help in defining this topic for other #etmooc’ers.

Synchronous Sessions for this Topic

We’ve intentionally lined up this particular topic with Open Education Week (March 10-15, 2013). One of the goals of #etmooc is to create awareness and promote open learning opportunities. We hope that you’ll participate in Open Education Week events and webinars and report them back to #etmooc in whatever way you choose.

Here’s an outline of what we’re offering for the first week of this topic (be sure to consult or subscribe to the calendar for your time zone information or to keep track of additions/changes):

  • On Tuesday March 5 (7pm Eastern), Alan Levine returns to #etmooc (live from Tokyo this time) to offer the session True Stories of Openness. Alan would love if you took the time to review http://stories.cogdogblog.com before the session (the resource mentioned above). This will allow for deeper discussion during the session. This session will be facilitated via Blackboard Collaborate – connect here.
  • On Thursday March 7 (1pm Eastern), we’re hosting an Open Education panel. This session will be broadcast on this Youtube channel, and #etmooc’ers can participate by using the #etmooc hashtag on Twitter. (read up on some of the panelists)
  • On Sunday March 10 (7pm Eastern), we’re hosting a similar Open Education panel, however, this particular panel will be more K-12 focused (panelists are K12 educators). This session will be broadcast on this Youtube channel, and #etmooc’ers can participate by using the #etmooc hashtag on Twitter. (read up on some of the panelists)
  • On March 6 & March 13 (both 7pm Eastern) we’ll be hosting our weekly Twitter chat sessions. Remember to watch for and use the #etmchat tag.
  • We’re working on adding another panel on the Future of Open Education for March 11 – however, we haven’t yet confirmed with the panelists. Look for details on the #etmooc Calendar and in the Twitter stream on the 11th.

We will not be offering any #etmooc specific sessions for this topic after March 11. Instead, as stated above, we’re suggesting that #etmooc’ers participate in the Open Education Week webinars (see schedule of events here). Please notice that ‘light blue’ events are face-to-face events, while the others are all openly available on the web. I am told that most of the sessions will be hosted in Blackboard Collaborate, so this should be familiar to our #etmooc crew.

Open Education is an incredibly important topic, and I hope that we can engage in this topic together, and share our learning with others.

Thanks to everyone who continues to share and support #etmooc. It’s been an incredible journey.

“Open Education is the simple and powerful idea that the world’s knowledge is a public good and that technology in general and the Worldwide Web in particular provide an extraordinary opportunity for everyone to share, use, and reuse knowledge.” ~The William & Flora Hewlett Foundation

And, finally, a few more resources to get you thinking:

K12 Open Movement: http://openlearningonline.wikispaces.com
K12 Open Ed: http://www.k12opened.com/
K12 OER Live Binder:http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/632119
Creative Commons :http://creativecommons.org/
Stephen Downes – MOOCs and OER’s

Special thanks to Verena Roberts, Laura Hilliger, and Alison Seaman who are doing an enormous amount of work behind the scenes.