Topic #4: The Open Movement – Open Access, OERs & Future of Education


cc licensed ( BY NC SA ) flickr photo shared by courosa

Welcome to topic #4!

Over the next two weeks we hope to support your thinking and creativity around the very BIG and nebulous topic of ‘The Open Movement’. So what exactly is the Open Movement? Well, it’s not one thing. Rather, the Open Movement is an umbrella term that describes a number of overlapping and interrelated movements that, collectively, support the idea of a free and open society in the Arts, Education, government, computing/code, research, technology, medicine, copyright/copyleft, and other key areas. Over the next two weeks, we will  focus (mostly) on the Open Education piece of this movement but, as always, feel free to move well beyond what we provide.

To get you thinking, here are a few suggested activities:

  1. Check out some of the Wikipedia articles around the Open Movement. See The Open Source Movement vs. The Free Software Movement (see tension between ‘Open’ & ‘Free’), The Free Culture Movement, Open Education, Open Access, Open Educational Resources and Open Government. Follow primary sources, read, write, synthesize, and share back to #etmooc. You will likely see that ‘open’ is much more than making something freely available on your website. There are deep philosophical, political, and pragmatic ideas embedded in each of these movements. What are the benefits? What are the tensions? What are the critiques? What does an open future look like? And, will it happen?
  2. Consider watching RIP: A Remixer’s Manifesto. It’s a full-length documentary available for free at Archive.org (read here about Archive.org – it’s a great resource). The documentary follows the life of remix artist Gregg Gillis (aka Girl Talk) and discusses the issues around fair use, copyright/copyleft, and remix. Near the end, the documentary bridges into the concept of free culture as it applies to Brazil’s favelas.  It would be great if #etmooc’ers shared their thoughts about the film in their own blogs or our Google Plus communityPerhaps we could even arrange an #etmooc synchronous screening and live Twitter chat if people are interested?
  3. For Higher Education participants in particular, I would strongly recommend viewing David Wiley‘s Keynote Presentation, Openness, Disaggregation, and the Future of Education (slides available here). Where does open education fit into what we do as educators and scholars? If you are in agreement that universities ought to be more open, how do we support this? For instance, if we support open access research, should we boycott locked-down academic journals?
  4. Watch Larry Lessig’s Talk Laws That Choke Creativity. Near the end of the talk, at 17:36, Lessig discusses how current copyright laws may affect our kids (“… ordinary people live life against the law, and that’s what we are doing to our kids … they live life knowing they live it against the law”). How important is copyright reform? How do we achieve a balanced approach for both consumers & creators, especially in a world where the distinction between these two groups is hardly noticeable.
  5. Do you have a story of openness that you’d like to share? If so, please consider supporting Alan Levine’s “True Stories of Openness” project found at: http://stories.cogdogblog.com. View some of stories already submitted, considering submitting your own, and share the resource with others.  This is a powerful project, and a wonderful way to promote and share the benefits of openness.

Additionally, we welcome you to suggest your ideas for readings, viewings, activities, etc. in your blog, on Twitter, or in our Google Plus Community. We look forward to your recommendations. Thanks for your help in defining this topic for other #etmooc’ers.

Synchronous Sessions for this Topic

We’ve intentionally lined up this particular topic with Open Education Week (March 10-15, 2013). One of the goals of #etmooc is to create awareness and promote open learning opportunities. We hope that you’ll participate in Open Education Week events and webinars and report them back to #etmooc in whatever way you choose.

Here’s an outline of what we’re offering for the first week of this topic (be sure to consult or subscribe to the calendar for your time zone information or to keep track of additions/changes):

  • On Tuesday March 5 (7pm Eastern), Alan Levine returns to #etmooc (live from Tokyo this time) to offer the session True Stories of Openness. Alan would love if you took the time to review http://stories.cogdogblog.com before the session (the resource mentioned above). This will allow for deeper discussion during the session. This session will be facilitated via Blackboard Collaborate – connect here.
  • On Thursday March 7 (1pm Eastern), we’re hosting an Open Education panel. This session will be broadcast on this Youtube channel, and #etmooc’ers can participate by using the #etmooc hashtag on Twitter. (read up on some of the panelists)
  • On Sunday March 10 (7pm Eastern), we’re hosting a similar Open Education panel, however, this particular panel will be more K-12 focused (panelists are K12 educators). This session will be broadcast on this Youtube channel, and #etmooc’ers can participate by using the #etmooc hashtag on Twitter. (read up on some of the panelists)
  • On March 6 & March 13 (both 7pm Eastern) we’ll be hosting our weekly Twitter chat sessions. Remember to watch for and use the #etmchat tag.
  • We’re working on adding another panel on the Future of Open Education for March 11 – however, we haven’t yet confirmed with the panelists. Look for details on the #etmooc Calendar and in the Twitter stream on the 11th.

We will not be offering any #etmooc specific sessions for this topic after March 11. Instead, as stated above, we’re suggesting that #etmooc’ers participate in the Open Education Week webinars (see schedule of events here). Please notice that ‘light blue’ events are face-to-face events, while the others are all openly available on the web. I am told that most of the sessions will be hosted in Blackboard Collaborate, so this should be familiar to our #etmooc crew.

Open Education is an incredibly important topic, and I hope that we can engage in this topic together, and share our learning with others.

Thanks to everyone who continues to share and support #etmooc. It’s been an incredible journey.

“Open Education is the simple and powerful idea that the world’s knowledge is a public good and that technology in general and the Worldwide Web in particular provide an extraordinary opportunity for everyone to share, use, and reuse knowledge.” ~The William & Flora Hewlett Foundation

And, finally, a few more resources to get you thinking:

K12 Open Movement: http://openlearningonline.wikispaces.com
K12 Open Ed: http://www.k12opened.com/
K12 OER Live Binder:http://www.livebinders.com/play/play/632119
Creative Commons :http://creativecommons.org/
Stephen Downes – MOOCs and OER’s

Special thanks to Verena Roberts, Laura Hilliger, and Alison Seaman who are doing an enormous amount of work behind the scenes.

#etmooc Lip Dub!

Well #etmooc, we’ve reached the end of our first topic, Connected Learning. This has been an amazing experience for me, as a facilitator and learner, as I’ve read through so many excellent posts and ideas from our participants. It’s wonderful to see the extent of sharing and support that has resulted through the development of this community. Thank you all!

And, I’m very excited to share our #etmooc crowdsourced #lipdub project! Thanks to a  community vote, a Google Doc, and our tireless editor @stumpteacher, we’ve created something that I feel is so very memorable and representative of this experience. Take a look – I hope you enjoy it.

Of course, what we’ve learned about Connected Learning will continue to guide us through #etmooc – it is core to its structure (or nonstructure). So, I hope that we will continue to contemplate, co-create, study, and live as connected learners.

Our next topic is Digital Storytelling, and an outline of the next two weeks will be shared tomorrow. If you haven’t been able to participate in #etmooc as you had originally intended, do not worry. Tomorrow is a new topic, with a fresh start.

Join in, invite a friend or colleague, and let’s spend the next two weeks discussing, sharing, and creating digital stories.

Connect with you soon.

Alec