If you have #etmooc envy, there’s a cure

Earlier this year I had the opportunity to participate in ETMOOC (my final reflections capture some of the experience) and am happy to now find that the community of educators that emerged from this event is at it again.

Starting in September comes #OOE13 – Open Online Experience 2013 – actually a school-year-long professional development opportunity for K-16 educators interested in technology and learning.…

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MOOC or xMOOC?

I’ve been internally debating the use of the term xMOOC to describe the Coursera/Udacity/edX offerings for a while now.  This first came about when I started to study neoliberalism, and realize that there was not a true north definition; it was a term that fit the needs of the author, and usually in a way that cast scorn and dispersions on those umbrellaed via it.…

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Square Peg in a Black Hole – Why Massive Online Courses are Giving Universities a Run for Their Money

mooc-connections1

Having done a considerable amount of research on student learning and digital learning tools to build my capstone experience for my graduate work, during and prior to my edTech MOOC experience, has solidified the idea of open education for me. I can imagine what Buckminster Fuller, a strong influencer in my thinking and work, might say about all this connectivist methodology.

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On how #edcmooc did a cmooc on Coursera

By demonstrating that you could build a very “open” course on Coursera, the University of Edinburgh team in charge of E-learning and Digital Cultures succeeded in breaking down some walls between the large-scale free course (called xMOOC by some critics) and the cMOOC connectivist learn-fest.…

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Sorting out “MOOCs”

It is a good season for “MOOCs”, Massive Open Online Courses, and you can spot several of them in full action. But the term “MOOC” has come to cover a range of wildly different  kinds of ehm… learning events. Indeed, for some of these, “course”, might be the wrong word.…

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Preparing for a Clash of MOOCs

ETMOOC LogoWhile I am absolutely loving my experience with ETMOOC, I am about to try my first run at an xMOOC. Tomorrow, I will begin a HarvardX course, HLS1x: Copyright. I am excited.

Copyright is a topic that I have been chasing on my own for a few years now and one where I think that educators must have greater command.…

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Effective learning in a cMOOC

Quote from Alec Couros on etmooc.org

 

For many people, even the more experienced networked learners, MOOCs can be overwhelming. In fact, some posit that complexity is an essential part of the experience. However, I am hoping to provide a bit of guidance and encouragement here to assure you that feelings of ‘being lost’ are common, but through persistence, sense-making, and personal connections, the vast majority of learners can persevere and make great gains through the dissonance and complexity.…

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A Critical Review of Andrew Ng’s “Learning from MOOCs”

My research and scholarship revolves around how learning technology (specifically recent explosions in distance and online learning technologies such as Khan Academy, cMOOCs and xMOOCs) affects the teaching profession.  There is great scholarship on the difficulties of distance instruction, and a whole host of people writing about educational technology while showing concern to stakeholders existing in academics.…

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The Scam of Online Learning Platforms

Reblogged from M.G. Piety:

Click to visit the original post

There’s an interview in this morning’s Inside Higher Education with Katie Blot, the president of Blackboard Education Services. Universities pay millions of dollars to Blackboard and similar companies for online learning services that are, in fact, available for free on the internet.

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