Getting the most out of peer instruction

Peer instruction is a powerful, evidence-based instructional strategy that supports active learning in all sizes of classes. Typically in peer instruction, every 15-20 minutes,

  1. the instructor poses a conceptually challenging, multiple choice question
  2. students think about the question on their own and vote for one of the choices using some kind of audience response tool
  3. students turn to their neighbors and discuss the question and their answers
  4. students may vote a second time, depending on the nature of the question
  5. the instructor leads a class-wide discussion where students share their thinking, finishing with
  6. the instructor models expert-like thinking and confirms why the right answers are right and the wrong answers are wrong

This can take anywhere from 2 to 10 or more minutes, depending on the question, the answers, and the richness of the discussion.…

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The Graduation Thesis: Insufficient and Outmoded

This the title of a recent article I wrote for my university research journal (Gakuen). In it, I advocate for subsuming the Graduation Thesis, common here in Japan among undergraduates, among a collection of other possible ways for demonstrating ability to work in a field.…

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The Pros and Cons of my ISTE Experience

​You know how Jimmy Fallon has his pros and cons lists for The Tonight Show?

Well, here is my list for my ISTE 2015 experience
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Pro: 
Spending time with like-minded educators around the world. A while ago I blogged about how I love twitter because instead of just being able to collaborate with the teachers in my hallway, I was now able to collaborate with amazing teachers everywhere!…
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Bringing the World into the Classroom with Twitter


At TCIS we have adopted Schoology as our primary tool of communication. We have adopted Schoology Groups as a type of blogging format, albeit basic, it is working well. This is however restricted to our immediate school community. What about the big wide world?…
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Creating Math Tutorials

One of the best ways to show you know how to do something is to teach that skill to another. In Grade 1 we like to record our learning and exhibit our understanding by making short video tutorials. In our classroom we have an iPad for each table (3-4 students) with Explain Everything installed.…
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The Web and Ed We Want via Justin Reich

Justin Reich’s recent Berkman Center talk – “The Web We Want and the Ed We Want” – is a great, actually entertaining tour through the recent history of the web and the parallel narrative of the web and education. I am posting it here as a note to myself.…
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Humans vs. tech: Reflections on #et4online

Let me start with the ending. I left the Online Learning Consortium’s 8th Annual Emerging Technologies Symposium inspired. But I was also struck by a game at play that has been going on forever. It was tiring – exhausting really – to see this game played out again.…
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Unexpected Practices

it is seldom about technology designers’ a priori plans for a technology, and more about users’ unexpected practices with it. That, to me, is the most fascinating and useful basis of research inquiry.

via Brief statement on ‘Digital Wisdom’ | Ibrars space.…

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